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Students

Margaret Bock

Margaret Bock

In the fall of 2016, after completing a bachelor’s degree in economics from Shepherd University, Bock began her first semester of graduate coursework in economics at West Virginia University. She was a teaching assistant for Dr. Feng Yao in the introductory microeconomics class. She attended CFE funded public lectures, the graduate student reading group, and weekly brown bag meetings. In regard to the reading group meetings and the brown bag lunches, she was able to listen to and discuss interesting economic research topics that she had not previously considered. This helped her to cultivate and spark future research ideas. As she continues her studies, with the support from the CFE, she hopes to pursue research interests in public, development, and international economics.

Perry Ferrell

Perry Ferrell

Ferrell is the Becker Fellow at the CFE. In 2017, he will be assisting Dr. Greg DeAngelo in teaching the introductory graduate level Microeconomics course.  Last year, with aid from the CFE, he got his first article out for review with Dr. Bryan McCannon and Dr. Greg DeAngelo, "Source of Deviant Behavior: Contrasting Alternative Explanations in the Laboratory."  He has presented research at both APEE and SEA conferences. Coursework in Public and Urban Economics has broadened his research interests and he is currently studying the effects of civil war and terrorism on various economic outcomes in Colombia.

Ning Ge

Ning Ge

Ge is currently in his second year as the Peter Thomas Bauer Fellow within the CFE. In the past year, he has started two research projects on economic institutions and economic reform. In addition, he has acted as the teaching assistant for Dr. Josh Hall's microeconomics class, during which he gained experience essential to his future teaching career. 



Collin Hodges

Collin Hodges

This semester represents the midway point of Hodges' third year as the Knut Wicksell Fellow with the Center for Free Enterprise. During the course of 2016, he had a coauthored paper on voting dynamics published. He also completed a promising research project on the relationship between changes in socioeconomic status and obesity prevalence. That article will be submitted for publication in 2017. Additionally, he is a coauthor for a tax chapter in the Mercatus Center’s  Taxing More Choice, forthcoming 2017.  He is presenting a paper on the voting dynamics of Colorado’s universal healthcare ballot initiative at the Academy of Economics and Finance in early 2017. Finally, beginning in the spring of 2017, he will be assuming responsibility for his first class of students, teaching introductory microeconomics.

Josh Matti

Josh Matti

Matti is in his second year and taking field classes in public and urban economics. Receiving the Swiger Fellowship has allowed him to focus on research. In the last year, he has had two co-authored papers accepted for publication. He is currently working on several different research projects related to his field classes. One project explores the trade-offs between consolidated versus fragmented local governments. Another paper tests for the influence of political factors on the distribution of USDA rural development funding. He has presented his research at two conferences this year and will present at the Public Choice conference in March 2017.

Amir Neto

Amir Neto

Neto is a third-year graduate student in the Department of Economics at WVU focusing on regional/urban economics and public economics. In 2016, he was awarded the W. Marston and Katharine B. Becker Doctoral Fellowship from the CFE. He had three papers published this year. Additionally, he was able to participate, funded by CFE, in the Public Choice Outreach Conference by George Mason University and at the NARSC Conference. He currently has five papers under review in different journals; one is with former CFE fellow Jamie Bologna. As he continues to work toward the completion of his degree, he has several projects under way, some of them with CFE affiliated faculty (Drs. Josh Hall and Brad Humphreys). Being funded by the CFE has also provided him with the opportunity to improve his teaching experience. This fall, he was a teaching assistant for Dr. Josh Hall and in spring 2017 he will be a teaching assistant for Dr. Brad Humphreys. The CFE brown bag presentations and reading club were also part of his routine. Both provided valuable opportunities to get acquainted with different and important research by fellow graduate students/professors as well as other scholars in the field.

Justin Parker

Justin Parker

Parker is currently a first-year PhD student in the Department of Economics. He holds a degree in Mathematical Economics and Applied Mathematics from Hampden-Sydney College (Class of 2016), and has conducted research in the fields of development and international economics. His current research interests center on rural economic development and studies into art markets.


 

Joylynn Pruitt

Joylynn Pruitt

Pruitt is a Mary Wallestonecraft Fellow who has seen much progress regarding research, conference presentations, and teaching opportunities. She currently have two articles under review, one of which is at the Journal of Legal Studies. She presented both of these articles at a number of conferences in the fall of 2016, including the RCN on Understanding Guilty Pleas in Arlington and the Southern Economic Association’s annual meeting. She is currently working on a project inspired by the research presented at the Understanding Guilty Pleas conference, which reinforces the benefits of participating in multi-disciplinary gatherings. She expects to have results ready to present at the upcoming APEE conference. Through the CFE, she has had many opportunities to share research and other interests with colleagues and has grown in pursuit of economic scholarship. She hopes to continue pursuing research interests in public and urban economics, as well as law and economics.

Hyunwoong Pyun

Pyun is a third-year Ph.D. student in Economics and earned candidacy in the end of last year. His research interests generally focus upon sports, urban, and health economics. This last year, he won the Best Young Researcher Paper Award from the 8th ESEA Conference for his paper, “Exploring the causal relationship between Major League Baseball games and crime: A synthetic control analysis.” He was able to accomplish this, in large part, due to the CFE’s generous support. He now has two (one co-authored and one solo-authored) papers under review in Applied Economics and Empirical Economics. He is also developing other papers with advisor Dr. Brad Humphreys. Lastly, he is teaching an online course (Principles of Macroeconomics).

Patrick Reilly

Reilly is a fourth year graduate student focusing on research exploring links between financial deregulation and education. In the past year, he has taught two principles level economics courses including an online course; presented research at the 2016 Southern Economic Association Conference; and, with the support of the CFE, was able to begin the publication process.

Danko Tarabar

Danko Tarabar

Tarabar is a 5th-year graduate student currently on the academic job market. Over the course of the past year, he has made tremendous progress, thanks to the help and guidance of advisors, Dr. Joshua Hall and Dr. Andrew Young. With them, he co-authored peer-reviewed articles published in Public Choice and Southern Economic Journal. He also has revisions requested for his sole-authored job market paper at the Journal of Comparative Economics. In addition to research, this year he successfully defended his dissertation proposal, taught two courses with full responsibility, and attended two academic conferences where he presented other works in progress.

Kai Cher Tay

Kai Cher Tay

Tay is a first-year student and a Center for Free Enterprise (CFE) Fellow. He works as a research assistant for Dr. Josh Hall, with whom he has had the opportunity to learn about research methods in academia. In addition, he enjoys participating in the weekly CFE brown bag presentations, graduate reading groups and Friday seminars. He is working on a research project with Dr. Bryan McCannon regarding trusting behavior and shill bidding, which he will present at the Association of Private Enterprise Education (APEE) annual conference in April. He is exploring various fields in economics before deciding on a research focus.

Paul Walker

Paul Walker

Walker is in his second year as the Antonio De Viti De Marco Fellow in the Center for Free Enterprise. In the spring of 2016, he gave presentations for the Center sponsored Brown Bags as well as his first academic presentation at the Association of Private Enterprise Education’s meeting. He is also working on an experimental economics research project with CFE affiliated Dr. Bryan McCannon. Over the summer, he attended the CFE sponsored empirical methods workshop, where he was able to network with other graduate students and develop better research tools. During the following fall semester, he served as a research assistant for Dr. McCannon, with whom he co-authored his first publication in Public Choice. He had a second co-authored publication accepted and published in the Review of Law and Economics. Additionally, he presented research at the Southern Economics Association, attended conferences and continued his professional development, all of which I would be unable to do without my fellowship and funding from the CFE.

Chris Yencha

Chris Yencha

After five years at WVU, Yencha is on the job market with high hopes! His job market paper, “Walkability Measures and Residential Property Value: Evidence from Computer Vision Methods,” as well as two other projects have been recently submitted to a combination of competitive field and general interest journals. He has taught a variety of entry level economics courses, both online and in person. With CFE’s generous assistance, he has attended three conferences since the end of last year, substantially improving his network and spurring on joint research with academics outside of WVU.

Yang Zhou

Yang Zhou

Zhou is a second year Ph.D. student in Economics and the Hugo Grotius Fellow with the Center for Free Enterprise. His research interests include public economics, urban & regional economics, public choice, and Austrian economics. He successfully passed comprehensive exams in June, which enables him to apply the skills learned from class to research. He is the teaching assistant to Dr. Brian Cushing for his business statistics class and the research assistant to Dr. Roger Congleton. This year, he received the "O.P. Alford III Prize in Political Economy" from the Mises Institute for his coauthored paper "Why Did China’s Population Grow So Quickly?"